Competing Against Luck

The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice

by Clayton M. Christensen , Taddy Hall , Karen Dillon , David S. Duncan

Number of pages: 288

Publisher: Harper Business

BBB Library: Human Resources, Sales and Marketing

ISBN: 978-0062435613



About the Authors

Clayton M. Christensen : is an American scholar, educator, author, business consultant, and religious leader,

Read More...

Taddy Hall : Taddy Hall is a Principal and Leader of Strategic Innovation at

Read More...

Karen Dillon : Karen Dillon is the former editor of Harvard Business Review magazine

Read More...

David S. Duncan : David S. Duncan is a featured speaker and author on topics

Read More...

Editorial Review

Customers don’t simply buy products or services; they hire them to do a job. Understanding customers does not drive innovation success. Understanding customer jobs does. If you build your foundation on the pursuit of understanding your customers’ jobs, your strategy will no longer need to rely on luck. In fact, you’ll be competing against luck when others are still counting on it. 

Book Reviews

“What entrepreneurs really need to know is how to find opportunities to innovate and create new products or services that will succeed. That's the subject of Christensen's just-released title, Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice (Harper Business; read an excerpt), co-written with Taddy Hall, Karen Dillon, and David Duncan.” - Inc.com

“As all of Christensen’s books, “Competing against Luck” is well written and quite easy to read. I found the underlying concept extremely helpful and intuitive.” - Value and Opportunity

“The book is written in a very solid, academic and workman-like style so it is not an exciting read. If you are familiar with Jobs-to-be-Done theory then you may be disappointed that the book contains no major new insights or revelations. Nevertheless, this volume covers the concept thoroughly and is an important addition to the bookshelf of any innovation advisor or practitioner.” - Innovation Excellence

“Christensen and his coauthors do make it easy to understand. The writing is clear, the ideas are well illustrated with diverse examples, and the chapters all end with key takeaways and questions for leaders to begin putting the pieces together and a plan in place.” - 800ceoread

“In Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice, Innosight’s cofounder Clay Christensen and senior partner David Duncan and their coauthors offer a game-changing look at how companies can develop and market products and services that customers actually want and need.” - InnoSight

“Clayton Christensen, Taddy Hall, Karen Dillon, and David Duncan are the co-authors of Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice. After years of research, the authors have come to one critical conclusion: our long held maxim—that understanding the customer is the crux of innovation—is wrong.” - The Marketing Journal

Books on Related Topics

Wisdom to Share

We have the ability to make innovation a reliable engine for growth, an engine based on a clear understanding of causality, rather than simply casting seeds in the hopes of one day harvesting some fruit.

If you build your foundation on the pursuit of understanding your customers’ jobs, your strategy will no longer need to rely on luck.

To elevate innovation from hit-or-miss to predictable, you have to understand the underlying causal mechanism–the progress a consumer is trying to make in particular circumstances.

Jobs Theory is not just another framework or marketing approach, but a powerful lens that has driven breakthrough innovation and transformational growth in some of the world’s most successful organizations–in wildly diverse arenas.

Jobs Theory transforms how you define the business you’re in, the size and shape of the market in which you compete, and who your competitors are.

If you are to create products and services that customers want to pull into their lives, you have to drill deep and look wide, identifying not only the functional, but also the social and emotional dimensions of the progress your customers are trying to make.

If a consumer hires your product for reasons other than its intended Job to Be Done, you risk alienating that consumer forever.

You have to understand not only what customers want to hire, but what they’ll need to fire to make room for the new solution; that entire context matters profoundly.

If you know how innovation works—what truly causes innovation to succeed—your efforts don’t have to be left to fate.

Books by the same Author

Day in and day out, millions of us take action based on what we think the future will hold. Investors buy shares when they think a company's future is bright and sell shares when they think a company's future is dim. Analysts try to understand what the future holds so they
Seeing What's Next

Day in and day out, millions of us take action based on what we think the future will hold. Investors buy shares when they think a company's future is bright and sell shares when they think a company's future is dim. Analysts try to understand what the future holds so they