Give and Take

Why Helping Others Drives Our Success

by Adam Grant

Number of pages: 320

Publisher: Random House

BBB Library: Communication, Personal Success

ISBN: 0143124986



About the Author

Adam Grant is the youngest full professor and single highest-rated teacher at The Wharton School.

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Editorial Review

According to conventional wisdom, highly successful people have three things in common: motivation, ability, and opportunity. Here is a fourth ingredient that’s critical but often neglected: success depends heavily on how we approach our interactions with other people. Every time we interact with another person at work, we have a choice to make: do we try to claim as much value as we can, or contribute value without worrying about what we receive in return?

Book Reviews

“An important book, destined to be a classic.”

In his book Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success, professor Adam Grant examines the most successful individuals in a variety of fields and finds one thing they all have in common, they are givers.

Though Grant acknowledges that taking is sometimes necessary, for most people, giving is not only the best way to succeed professionally, but to be happy.

Adam Grant has a message for us, a big message: Success does not have to come at someone else’s expense.

Adam Grant provides the perfect combination of storytelling and research to enable the reader to apply the principles of Give and Take. He provides the groundwork for shifting society’s fundamental ideas about how to succeed!

This is a substantive read, but Grant weaves in real-life stories to support his evidence as well as any author you will find.

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Wisdom to Share

According to conventional wisdom, highly successful people have three things in common: motivation, ability, and opportunity.

Takers have a distinctive signature: they like to get more than they give. They tilt reciprocity in their own favor, putting their own interests ahead of others’ needs.

In the workplace, givers are a relatively rare breed. They tilt reciprocity in the other direction, preferring to give more than they get.

Professionally, few of us act purely like givers or takers, adopting a third style instead. We become matchers, striving to preserve an equal balance of giving and getting.

Givers and matchers often see networking as an appealing way to connect with new people and ideas.

Givers’ networking style stands in stark contrast to the way that takers and matchers tend to build and extract value from their connections.

Matchers tend to build smaller networks than either givers, who seek actively to help a wider range of people, or takers, who often find themselves expanding their networks to compensate for bridges burned in previous transactions.

Takers and matchers make hard-and-fast assumptions about just who will be able to provide the most benefit in exchange.

We tend to privilege the lone genius who generates ideas that enthrall us, or change our world.

Givers reject the notion that interdependence is weak. Givers are more likely to see interdependence as a source of strength, a way to harness the skills of multiple people for a greater good.

Books by the same Author

The hallmark of originality is rejecting the default and exploring whether a better option exists. The starting point is curiosity: pondering why the default exists in the first place. We’re driven to question defaults when we experience vuja de, the opposite of déjà vu. Déjà vu occurs when we encounter something
Originals

The hallmark of originality is rejecting the default and exploring whether a better option exists. The starting point is curiosity: pondering why the default exists in the first place. We’re driven to question defaults when we experience vuja de, the opposite of déjà vu. Déjà vu occurs when we encounter something