The App Generation

How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World

by Howard Gardner , Katie Davis

Number of pages: 256

Publisher: Wiley

BBB Library: Communication, Technology and Globalization

ISBN: 9780300196214



About the Authors

Howard Gardner : Howard Gardner is the Professor of Cognition and Education at the

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Katie Davis : Katie Davis received her EdD at Harvard University and is currently

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Editorial Review

Young people growing up in our time are not only immersed in apps: they’ve come to think of the world as an ensemble of apps, to see their lives as a string of ordered apps, or perhaps, in many cases, a single, extended, cradle-to-grave app. (We’ve labeled this overarching app a “super-app.”) Whatever human being might want should be provided by apps; if the desired app doesn’t yet exist, it should be devised right away by someone (perhaps the seeker); and if no app can be imagined or devised, then the desire (or fear or conundrum) simply does not (or at least should not) matter. Apps are great if they take care of ordinary stuff and thereby free us to explore new paths, form deeper relationships, ponder the biggest mysteries of life, forge a unique and meaningful identity. But if apps merely turn us into more skilled couch potatoes who do not think for ourselves, or pose new questions, or develop significant relationships, or fashion an appropriate, rounded, and continually evolving sense of self, then the apps simply line the road to serfdom, psychologically speaking.

Book Reviews

"Thoughtful book “The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy and Imagination in a Digital World,” explores how young people view themselves and their relationships when smart devices are nearly ubiquitous, social rites happen via text message and the currency of popularity is traded in likes and comments on social-sharing apps." The New York Times

"The App Generation is not a pean to a new technology or a Cassandra's warning, but rather a tale of how technology leads to shifts in culture and how emerging cultures shape and are shaped by human psychology." Education Week

Books on Related Topics

Wisdom to Share

It’s our argument that young people growing up in our time to cradle-to-grave app.

If apps merely turn us into more skilled couch potatoes who do not think for ourselves, then the apps simply line the road to serfdom, psychologically speaking.

Apps can facilitate superficial ties, discourage face-to-face confrontations and interactions.

Apps can make you lazy, discourage the development of new skills, limit you to mimicry.

Digital media gives youth the time and tools to craft an attractive identity, as well as an audience to view and respond to it.

Facebook and other social network sites emphasize self-presentation by organizing their sites around users’ individual profiles.

Technology was intended to free up time for unstructured contemplation, but paradoxically it seems to have had the opposite effect.

Epitomizing the purpose of the app, we’re more focused on doing than on being.

The app mentality supports the belief that just as information, goods, and services are always and immediately accessible, so too are people.

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